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Coach Steve Pavlovic's Ezine Archives

"Proven tips for  youth basketball coaches"

  

 

 

         

 Select an issue from the list below: 

                      July 2002      August 2002          September 2002   

               October 2002    November 2002   December 2002

               January 2003      February 2003       March 2003

                     April 2003      May 2003                June 2003

                      July 2003      August 2003          September 2003

               October 2003     November 2003     December 2003

              

      

 

 

  

                      July 2002 Ezine
------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

06/30/2002 July 2002 Newsletter Issue #1
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter"
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Summer Break: A Time to Retool
=> Shooting - Keep your Players Close
=> Dribbling - Ball Handling Drills are a Must
=> Passing - The Weighted Ball Method to Better Passing
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Have a Pratice Plan
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Does your team need to improve their shooting? Do you need
to score more points? Did you lose some games by a few
points while missing easy shots? Then make sure you check
out my ebook "Coach Steve Pavlovic's Score More Hoops" at
http://www.scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Summer Break: A Time to Retool
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

Well, June is here, the sun is out, basketball is the 
furthest thing from your mind. But should it be? No way!
The summer months are the perfect time to reflect on your
past season and get ready for next season. Here's some ideas
for you:

1) Re-evaluate yourself as a coach.
Were there things you didn't fully grasp last season?
Defenses or offenses that were run against your team
that confused you? Take this opportunity to look back
at those scenarios and see what you could have done
differently.

2) Re-evaluate your team.
Did your players perform as you expected them to?
What areas does your team need to improve in? Jot down
some notes now, before you forget. Read up on drills
to help your team. You can work on these in a summer
league, if available to your team, or by handing out
note cards with suggested drills to your players, so
they can work on them individually.

3) Plan for next season.
If you are a returning coach, it's not too early to
think about next year. Would you like to run a
different offense or defense? Find one that suits
your team, and start thinking how your players will
fit. You can take your time and find one that's
right for your team without being rushed for time.
If you are a first year coach, you can start planning
also. Start outlining drills and skills that you
will work on for your team. Read and study drills for
your appropriate grade level. This will give you a 
headstart come fall.

So don't waste this opportunity for you or your team. Take
an hour here or there(like on a rainy day!). It will really
pay off next season!

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Keep your Players Close

Whether you are practicing with your players over the
summer, or they are practicing on their own, encourage them
to take shots close to the basket. Keep the range between
10 - 15 feet. When they are comfortable and hitting 
consistently from that range, let your outside shooters move
back some. I've seen too many times where my outside 
shooters work on their 3 point shots too much, then can't
hit the 15 footer. Make sure their routine includes the
closer jumpshots first!

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Ball Handling Drills are a Must

I always like to start off my practices with some ball
handling drills, and I highly recommend my players work on
it over the summer. Not all will do that, but I can
immediately tell in the fall who has! Just once or twice a
week for 15 minutes will make a big improvement. Here's
some simple ones to do:
Dribbling in place with their head up (left & right hand)
Dribbling up and down court or driveway
Passing ball around leg (left and right, builds up hand
strength and coordination)

------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - The Weighted Ball Method to Better Passing

If your team is like mine, they will occasionally throw 
lazy passes. All too often, these passes are stolen and
converted into fast break baskets. To encourage strong
passes, I like to run some passing drills with a weighted
basketball. This makes them throw the ball harder, and 
forces the pass receiver to keep their hands up and ready.
After a cycle of drills using this ball, I run the same
drills again with a regular basketball. The difference is
very noticable!

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Have a Pratice Plan

It sounds like such common sense, that you are probably 
thinking, "Tell me something I don't know!" Yet I still
see coaches running practices by the seat of their pants.
No one (even them) knows what is going to worked on, or what
is coming next. Ultimately, this leads to breaks in the
practice, as the head coach and assistants get together to
decide on the next drill. What a waste of time! Always
have a practice plan put together and go over it with your
assistants beforehand. You might even want to get your
assistants input before you put your plan together. 
Nothing says you can't stray from the schedule, like if you
feel you need more time on a specific drill. But at least
everyone will know your course of action!

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.

------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic
Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com


                      August 2002 Ezine
------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

07/31/2002 ** August 2002 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - A Solid Base in Offense and Defense
=> Defense - Shuffle, but Don't Dance!
=> Dribbling - Head's Up
=> Rebounding - Some simple drills
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Be Patient With Your Team 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Does your team need to improve their shooting? Do you need
to score more points? Did you lose some games by a few
points while missing easy shots? Then make sure you check
out my ebook "Coach Steve Pavlovic's Score More Hoops" at
http://www.scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, A Solid Base in Offense and Defense
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

There are many similar actions performed on both offense
and defense, none of them more important than your base.
By base, I mean the set up of your feet and legs, the
"foundation", so to speak, of your "basketball building".
Just as with a real building, it's strength is only as good
as it's foundation. So we must have a solid base to start
with, or our further actions will suffer.

The first place we must have a solid base is when we shoot.
As I discuss in detail in my ebook, a solid base is very
important to a successful shot. The feet and legs should be
shoulder width apart. Any wider and you will be off balance.
Any closer together and you will feel awkward when you bend
your knees to shoot. Try it out and you'll see what I mean!
Since this is part of the power source of our shot, it is
essential that you have a good base, or your shot will 
suffer.

The second place you must have a solid base is on defense.
The same principles apply as above. If your feet are too
close together, you will probably get your feet tangled if
you need to make a quick move. If they are too far apart,
you will not be able to move into position to cut off the
offensive player. Once again, a good base would be to keep
your feet shoulder width apart. That will keep your body
in balance and ready to move in any direction.

The third place a solid base is required is in rebounding.
We will discuss rebounding more in upcoming issues, because
it is an often overlooked and misunderstood subject.
Rebounding is more than just jumping to grab a missed shot.
It is the process of keeping an opposing player away from
the basket and allowing your team to gain control of the
ball. This is accomplished by using your body to make 
yourself big. It starts with a solid base, shoulder width
apart, and using the lower part of your body to keep your
opponent away from the ball. Keeping a solid base will
prevent your opponent from just moving you out of the way.
Your body will be in balance and your opponent will have to
either go around you or foul you to get to the ball. 

So no matter what action you are performing on the court,
emphasize the concept of a solid base to your players. It
is the key building block to any successful team. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Shuffle, but Don't Dance!

The quickest way to get around on defense is by using
short, quick steps. Stay low to the ground and shuffle,
making sure that the legs don't cross. As you shuffle, the
feet should stay shoulder width apart. Don't let your feet
hit together! If they do, you'll start doing what I call
the "Bunny Hop". Your entire body will come up and you'll
look like you are hopping instead of shuffling. So to play
good defense, stay low, knees bent, and take short, quick 
steps. You'll be able to guard your opponent much better!

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Head's Up

One point I can't emphasize enough is to teach young
players to keep their eyes off the ball when they dribble.
This is why I stress ball handling drills with my players,
concentrating on keeping their heads up. Last month, I gave
you some simple drills to do with your players. No matter
what age, always remember to review these or similar drills.
Learning to dribble with their heads up will help your
players to see the whole court so they can find their open 
teammates, and see where the defense is set up at. It will
improve your team's offense tremendously. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Some Simple Drills

To learn the basics of blocking out, you must first learn
about staying between your man and the basket, and using 
your lower body to stay there.

Drill #1 - Coach at the free throw line, players with their
backs to the basket. On the whistle, players 
quickly turn toward basket, feet shoulder width
apart, knees bent, hands either in front of body
to grab ball, or hands at side with palms facing
back to find offensive player. Don't let hands
go farther back than the body!

Drill #2 - Put a ball in the center jump circle. 1 Player
is offense, 1 is defense. Players face each 
other outside circle. On the whistle, defender
turns and gets into rebounding stance, while
offensive player tries to get around. Object
is to stay low, shuffle, and use your lower body
to keep offense out. Don't use your arms to 
wrap aroung offense, that is a foul! Goal is to
keep the offense out for 3-5 seconds.

Drill #3 - 1 line of players at free throw line extended, 
other line at baseline of same side. Player at
baseline passes to first player near free throw 
line, who will take a jump shot. Player who
threw pass will come out to block out this 
shooter and get rebound.

For drills #2 and #3, an incentive can be added, such as
the first player with 5 rebounds doesn't have to run laps,
etc. This will keep everyone's attention, and will help to
simulate a game situation.

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Be Patient With Your Team

Whether it's summer or the beginning of next season, 
remember to have patience. It would be nice if all your
players came back and could tell you they practiced all their
skills for 2 hours everyday, but that's not going to happen!
Get them back into the groove slowly, not expecting the 
highest level of play immediately. This doesn't mean that
you let any mistakes go uncorrected. But give them a 
practice or 2 to get back into a basketball frame of mind.
Work on the basics, whether it be ball handling or 
conditioning. Once you have their attention, it will be a 
better scenario for both you and your team! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                         September 2002
------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

08/31/2002 ** September 2002 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Get in Shape with a Purpose
=> Defense - Keep an eye on your opponent's midsection 
=> Dribbling - Left and right hand
=> Passing - Review technique
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Find out any Health Concerns 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
I've added some free coaching resources to the website!
There is a PDF file on dealings with parent problems, which
is a must-read for any coach. There are PDF files for
an attendance sheet and roster. Feel free to download and
use any of the info, and pass it along to any other coaches
or parents that you think it would help.

Find out my unique perspective on shooting in 5 easy steps.
Check out my ebook "Coach Steve Pavlovic's Score More Hoops"
at http://www.scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Get in Shape with a Purpose
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
Well it's almost time! Some teams will be starting in 
September, others in October. But it's time to start 
putting a plan together. Time flies when you're having fun!

I always stress defense with my teams. I'm a firm believer
that defense wins games. So to play tough defense, my
players must be in shape. I get them in shape both
physically and mentally.

Mentally, I get my players into a basketball frame of mind.
A long layoff over the summer must be replaced by mental
toughness. They must be thinking about basketball now, no
time for daydreaming. I constantly give them a mental image
of what I want them to accomplish. Repeating a key point or
buzz word also helps jog their memory. And yes, sometimes a
stern correction for making the same mistake multiples times
will help them focus on the basketball season. Get them
thinking your way!

Physically, my players must be in shape to play the tough
man-to-man defense that I expect. We do a lot of running
and shuffling drills. But I never have a drill just to run.
I always make sure it has a purpose. If you are going to 
make them run lines or laps, have them dribble a basketball.
This way they must concentrate on dribbling, they are still
getting into shape, and they stay focussed. Just running
with no purpose gets boring very fast. You can then quickly
lose their attention and practice is no longer productive.

So look at your drills before you practice and ask 
yourself if it has a basketball purpose. If not, modify it
so you can accomplish 2 tasks at once. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Keep an eye on your Opponent's Midsection

As you start reviewing your defense, remind your players
not to stare an offense player in the eyes or stare at the
ball. A simple head fake could cause you to lose your person 
you were guarding. Instead, focus on the midsection or hips
of their body. They can't go anywhere without that! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Left and right hand

Dribbling drills are important, especially at the
beginning of the season. No matter what age group, pay close
attention to both the right and left hand in these drills.
Don't assume that your team knows how to dribble. If they
haven't picked up a ball in a while, they might need some
work now. Have the players focus on their weak hand and get 
60% of the work with that hand. It will pay off for your
players later in the season. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Review technique

Review the proper passing techniques with your team:

1) Hands on the sides of the ball
2) Ball is at your chest in the middle of your body
3) Make sure you step toward your target
4) Extend hands to throw pass
5) Finish with thumbs facing down

A simple drill to run is to set your players across from
each other, about 10 feet apart. You can then work on the
chest, bounce, and overhead pass. Try to match players
that are close in ability, so that no one gets hurt and 
balls aren't flying all over the gym. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Find out any Health Concerns

The first thing I do when my team has its first practice
is to find out from either the players or their parents about
any health concerns. With younger players, I always check 
with their parents. I want to know who has asthma or any 
other condition that I need to watch out for. If the player
needs an inhaler, I want to make sure they always have it at 
practices as well as games. This way I am prepared and not
caught off guard. I can keep a closer eye on these players.
The last thing I want as a coach is for something to happen
to one of my players!

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                           October 2002 

-----------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

09/30/2002 ** October 2002 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Defense is the Key to your Season
=> Shooting - Keep your elbow straight
=> Defense - Have your palms up 
=> Dribbling - Learning the crossover dribble
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Be prepared for emergencies 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
I've added another free coaching resource to the website!
This is a PDF file on the subject of man-to-man defense.
As you know, I really like my teams to play man-to-man
defense. Read an article I have put together on the 
"man-to-man vs. zone defense debate." See what you think!

Now is the time to refresh your memory on shooting.
Check out my ebook "Coach Steve Pavlovic's Score More Hoops"
at http://www.scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Defense is the Key to Your Season
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
Since my first ebook, "Score More Hoops" has come out, I
have spent a lot of time developing my other basketball
interest, which is playing defense. My new ebook, "Defend
The Hoop" is almost ready to go. In it, I will show you 
how to teach your players to play tough and agressive
man-to-man defense. As your players get older, more and 
more of them can put the ball in the hoop. But not all of
them can play great defense. This is why I stress the
fundamentals of defense with my teams. I want to give my
team an advantage over all the others.

When I first started playing basketball, shooting was not
one of my greatest assets. I had a tough time, being small
and not having a lot of power. But I quickly learned that
even when I was having an off night offensively, I could
still contribute on defense. That not only helped my team,
but helped keep me in the game and off the bench!

I always tell my players, no matter whether their shot is
falling or not, they must always have a good night 
defensively. Players will get driven by or lose their person
sometimes, but they must always hustle. Unless you are sick,
you should be able to hustle all the time.

Stress defense with your team and it will make your 
offense even better. A good tough man-to-man defense will
lead to steals by your team or turnovers by your opponent.
Either way, it can mean some easy buckets, and in a lot of
cases, a change in the momentum of the game.

I would encourage you to stress defense in your early
season drills. It will not only get your players in shape,
but help them get in a "defense" frame of mind. That doesn't
mean you should neglect your offense though. Keep a good
balance between reviewing both of them. You'll need your
team to perform well in both areas!

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Keep your Elbow Straight

One of the problems I see players of all ages have is 
that their elbow and shooting arm are not straight. The ball
must be positioned to the side of the body, not the middle of
the body. If the ball is in the middle, your natural
tendency will be to push the ball to one side or the other.
Keeping your elbow straight up and down in line with your
shooting leg will put the ball on a straight path. Try it
and see what I mean! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Have your Palms Up

When playing defense, make sure your players have their
palms facing up. The reason is that they can pop the ball
upward from someone dribbling in front of them. This method
means you will make contact with the ball, and not the 
player's arm or wrist. Reaching with your palms down
usually results in a foul being called, because contact with
the offensive player is usually made. And many times even if
there is no contact, a referee will still call a foul,
because they assume there is contact. So use your palms
facing up, and flip your wrist to make those great steals.

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Learning the Crossover Dribble

Once your players learn the basic left and right hand
dribble, and can do it while advancing the ball, you can
teach them the crossover dribble. This is a simple move
that will come in handy to keep a defender off balance and
help your players to get around them.
The way to perform this goes as follows:

1) Get into a proper stance for dribbling.
2) Start dribbling the ball with the left or right hand.
3) Have the opposite hand out ready to receive the ball.
4) While continuing to dribble, sweep the ball across your
body to the other hand, which will now take over the
dribble. Don't stop the ball and catch it, that will
lead to you losing your dribble or committing a
turnover.
5) Adjust your body so that you have once again created
a dribbling pocket, which means the ball side leg is
about a half step behind the opposite leg. This gives
you a place to dribble, and helps protect the ball. 
6) Now get the hand without the ball ready to receive it
back again and repeat the process.

Once your players can do this in place, here's a few 
drills to get them moving:

1) Get in correct dribbling position. On the whistle, have
them sweep the ball to the other hand and continue
dribbling. Let them go for 5 seconds, then blow the
whistle again so they can do the crossover back the
other way. Focus on using the body to protect the
dribble, especially 5) and 6) from above.

2) Same as Drill 1), except using movement. Line players
up along baseline in 1 or 2 rows. On the whistle, they
will proceed down the court using the crossover dribble.
On the next whistle, they will stop while continuing 
their dribble. Once again, focus on proper technique,
especially, keeping the dribble below the waist. Stress
that this is not a race. Make them focus on doing it
correctly, taking it slow at first.

3) Line up cones about 5 feet apart going down the court.
Players start single file, they will use the
crossover dribble to get around the cones. Start the
players going to either the right or the left. That
should also be the hand they start out dribbling with.
When they get around a "defender", they should use the
crossover dribble to get the ball to the other hand.
Continue around the cones, and down the court in this 
manner. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Be Prepared for Emergencies

Whether you are a first time coach or a veteran coach, you
need to be prepared for the unexpected! Here's some things I
like to keep in mind in case of an emergency:

Evacuation plan for building I am practicing in.
Have a cell phone with or know where phone is in building.
Emergency numbers of police and fire department.
Contact and emergency numbers of my players and coaches.
Carry or have available to you a medical kit.

Hopefully you don't need most of these, but it's better to
be safe than sorry. Remember, the safety of the children is
your primary concern. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                           November 2002
------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

10/31/2002 ** November 2002 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Don't rush - Do a few things right 
=> Shooting - Keep your shoulders squared
=> Defense - Cut off those baselines and sidelines 
=> Rebounding - Get yourself into position
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Keep everyone informed 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
If you haven't checked out my site lately, take a look!
Check out my ebook "Coach Steve Pavlovic's Score More Hoops"
at http://www.scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Don't rush - Do a few things right
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
There never seems to be enough time from when you have your
first practice and your first game. Whether it be 
conditioning, offense, or defense, there is so much to go
over! Too many times though, I have seen coaches try to cram
everything into their player's heads before their first game.
Then they are surprised when the team doesn't play well in
it's first few games. Is it any wonder?
There is only so much your players are going to absorb.
You can lecture all you want, but only a portion will be
remembered before your team gets overwhelmed. So what is a
coach to do?
I can tell you what I do. I make sure that conditioning is
at the top of my list. Then I make sure to review all the
basics, especially ball handling, shooting, and defensive
position. I then go over a basic offense, a basic out of
bounds play, and a basic defensive scheme. I leave it at 
that! I go over this the first few games, trying to do a few
things well, rather than giving my team a lot and having them
perform nothing well. I want them to do a few things very
well before we move on and add more options. I also don't
worry about wins and losses the first few games. I am
looking for improvement. If we improve and execute the basics,
the wins will take care of themselves. 
There will be plenty of time to add and build on the basics.
So don't rush into everything. Start off slow. Your team
will benefit in the long run! 


------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Keep your shoulders squared

Besides not having their elbow straight, the next problem
I see the most in shooting is not being squared up to the 
basket. Players are in such a hurry to receive a pass and 
shoot the ball that they don't take a split second to square
up. By rushing the shot, they are not in correct shooting
position and the shot usually is off target. 
I work with my players often to get squared up to the 
basket. We run drills where our players receive a pass and 
have to square their shoulders and make sure their elbow
is straight. Then we add a defender to simulate a game
situation. After a short time, you will see a definite
improvement.

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Cut off those sidelines and baselines

There is nothing more frustrating than to see your team
playing great defense, then let a player go past them on
the sideline, or drive the baseline. It just seems to take
the wind out of your sails! 
I always tell my teams that the baseline and sideline are
like extra defenders. An offensive player can't dribble
outside of them. Use them to your advantage.
Whenever we perform any defensive drills, I make my players
get to these lines and put their foot on it. Not next to it,
but right on it. This way, there is no way an offensive 
player can get by without knocking you over or stepping out
of bounds. 
------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Get yourself into position

In order to get a rebound, your players must react as soon
as the shot goes up. Too many times, players stand around
and watch the shot go towards the hoop. If it doesn't go in,
the odds are that their opponent has gone toward the basket 
to get the rebound.
I stress to my team that they can't be spectators. They
must get into rebounding position immediately upon release
of the shot.
Here are some guidelines for teaching the steps to 
rebounding:

1) Play normal defense, then turn to block out when the
shot goes up.
2) Establish a good base and make contact with your
opponent. You can do this by feeling with the palm
of your hand, or making contact with your backside.
You are not grabbing your opponent or knocking into
them. You are just making sure you know where your
opponent is and that they don't get around you.
3) Stay low and be ready to use your body, not your arms,
to stop your opponent from going around.
4) Keep your eye on the ball, time your jump, and
extend your arms toward the ball as it comes off the 
backboard or rim.
5) Make sure you go up agessively and grab the rebound 
with both hands. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Keep everyone informed

In your free "15 Characteristics of a Successful Youth 
Coach", I talk about communications. I can't stress
this point enough. People today are so busy with their jobs,
their children, and other sports that they have a hard time
keeping their schedule straight. The last thing they need is
a surprise practice or game that you forgot to tell them
about.
As soon as you get information on practices or games, get
it to your players as soon as possible. Stress to your
players how important it is that they give that sheet to 
their parent's immediately! This helps teach the player
to be responsible. 
I would also encourage you to meet with the parents at the
beginning of the season. Let them know when your normal
practice nights will be, as well as when your games will be,
if you know that. Explain to them that there might be times
when they only get short notice, especially if you are in a 
tournament. Explain any team rules you have. Be upfront with
the parents, and they will help make your season successful! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                              December 2002
------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

11/30/2002 ** December 2002 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Players Must Practice to Improve 
=> Shooting - The Lay-up 
=> Defense - See More than Just the Ball 
=> Passing - Have Your Hands Ready
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Let Your Assistants Help 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

My new ebook on defense is now available!!! Check it out at:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Players Must Practice to Improve Their Skills
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

I don't know about your basketball program, but ours is
growing so fast that we don't get as much practice time as
we used to. I know some teams can get in the gym almost any
time they want. We are lucky to get in twice a week. How can
you get your team to accomplish everything you want them to
in such a short period of time? How can you go through all the
drills that you need to prepare your team?

It's difficult, but it's not impossible. I make sure that
I show them a lot of basic drills: dribbling, passing, 
shooting, even defensive shuffling. Then I constantly stress
to them the need to work on these drills on their own at home.
Just 15 minutes or so a few times a week will help them
improve their skills. These are things that once you get into
playing games end up being neglected at practice anyway. So
it's a real benefit for them to do this.

Will they all do it? Of course not! The players that do
will stand out from the others. In just 3 weeks of practice
so far, I can tell which players are working on their own
and which haven't picked up a ball since the last practice.

These aren't difficult things to perform. Some simple 
dribbling and ball handling drills can be done outside on the
driveway, in the garage, or even in the basement. Passing
drills can be done with a parent or a brother/sister. Some
shooting drills can be done when the weather is warm, if not,
I encourage my players to go through their shooting motion
without a ball, infront of a mirror. Then they can evaluate
their technique and make sure they are shooting correctly.

So how can you get your players to do this? I have a few
ways. The first is to address it with the parents at your
team's parent meeting. I explain to the parents how important
it is for their child to practice on his/her own. This gets
many of them to do it and quit watching TV or playing video
games! Another thing I do is to reward my team for working
on their own. If I can tell they are putting in the extra
effort, I'll let them scrimmage each other a little longer
than normal. Players always like that!

I'm sure you can think of even more ways to convince your
players. But the most convincing argument is that it will
help make them a more complete basketball player. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - The Lay-up

The lay-up is the easiest shot in basketball, yet 
probably the most missed shot. How many times has one of your
players made a nice drive to the basket, only to bang the ball
off the backboard? It gets frustrating for both players and
coaches.

When learning to shoot lay-ups, I show the players to plant
the inside foot while extending their shooting hand and 
bringing up their shooting side leg. They need to have a
straight elbow, as well as having their shoulders squared to
where they are shooting. They also need to aim inside the
square on the backboard. You can even get them to practice
this technique without a ball. 

I always stress using the backboard. Some players like to
lay the ball in, but I see many shots like this missed. The
backboard is there to help on this shot. Take advantage of
it! The other problem is shooting the ball too hard. I tell
my players that the faster they are moving toward the basket,
the lighter they must lay the ball off the backboard. Once
they understand these two concepts, they will make many
more lay-ups. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - See More Than Just the Ball

Whether your team plays man-to-man defense or zone, they
must be aware of everything going on around them on the
court. Players focus on where the ball is, which yes, is
important. But just as important are the players without
the ball. They are cutting, exchanging, setting picks,
anything to get open for a good shot. So your players must
be alert for this. I work with my players on keeping their
eyes moving so they see what's coming. I also work with them
on never completely turning their back to the weak side of
the court. They need to be aware that someone from the weak
side is probably coming over to receive a pass. If my team
is alert, the weak side defenders can stop someone from 
coming over, or at least communicate to the strong side
defenders that something is about to happen. A strong
defense needs all 5 players on the floor to be involved.

------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Have Your Hands Ready

In any drills we run, I stress to my players about having
their hands ready. Over the years, I have seen numerous
players miss catching easy passes because their hands were
at their sides. I have even seen some get hit upside the
head with the ball because they couldn't react to the 
ball quick enough.

Have your players run any drills with the hands out as 
though they are catching a pass. Like I tell my players,
it takes more energy to put your hands down and bring them
up again, as it does to just leave them up and ready. 
Usually when I phrase it that way, since it sounds like a
shortcut, I can get them to start doing it. And the
dropped and fumbled passes go way down as well!

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Let Your Assistants Help

Most of you as coaches probably have some type of assistant
coaches to help out. Take advantage of this. You can use
your assistants to divide up drills into separate groups,
work with individuals who need more attention, or give them
a specific area to watch while running a drill or play. I see
too many times where assistant coaches are not given any
responsibility. The head coach just takes for granted that
the assistant is doing something. Don't get caught in this
trap! Lay out exactly what you would like each assistant to
do during a practice, and give them something to do during
the game, like watching your offense or defense or talking
to players about something they weren't doing when they come
out of a game. 

Doing this will benefit your team in 2 ways. First, they
will be on the same page as the head coach. Second, they
will be learning and can take over if the head coach is
gone, or can become a head coach themselves one day. 

Assistant coaches are a valuable resource. They are an
extra set of eyes for the head coach and can give input
to many situations. A good assistant coach makes the
head coach and the entire team a success. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! Merry Christmas and see you in 2003!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2002 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                    January 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

12/31/2002 ** January 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

Happy New Year everyone!!! Hope 2003 is a great year.

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - You Must Move on Offense too! 
=> Dribbling - Use Your Fingertips for Control 
=> Rebounding - Use Your Backside 
=> Defense - The Drop Step 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Develop All of Your Players 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

My new ebook on defense is now available!!! Check it out at:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm

Also, my website has been awarded a "Golden Web Award"!!!
Check it out at the bottom of my site.

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, You Must Move on Offense too!
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

I spend a lot of time instructing my players to be 
aggressive on defense. I want them on the floor for loose
balls, blocking out, and applying pressure man-to-man defense.
Standing still on defense is a sure way to get beaten. But I
also remind my players that they must move on offense too.

Moving on offense is just as important. You must be
aggressive going to the basket. Going half speed won't cut
it. A defender will come over and cut off your lane. You then
run the risk of loosing the ball, or having to pull up to
take a jump shot. A player must find an opening in the
defense and take advantage of it quickly.

Movement is also essential to receive a pass. If you are
a perimeter player, and the defense is sagging in, this
won't be a problem. But playing against a team that is
applying pressure defense, or if you are an inside player,
you will have to move to get open. Whether it is 
establishing position with your body in the post, or 
making a cut to get open on the wing position, you must 
move to become an open target. 

Players many times think they are open when they really
aren't. I like to tape a few games each year and show it
to my players. Then they begin to understand that just
because they moved a step or two, doesn't mean they have
lost the defender. This visual aid helps reinforce what I
have already told them. Then when we practice these drills,
the players realize how important a good move is to receive
a pass. And you can't score if you don't get the ball. That
fact alone is usually enough to make players want to make
cuts to get open!

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Use Your Fingertips for Control

One of the hardest things to get younger players to
understand is the use of the fingertips when dribbling. I
see players start out by slapping the ball with their fingers
or their palm. This will obviously not help with controlling
the dribble. Only by using the fingertips will a player
become a proficient ballhandler.

How do you get your players to do this? A lot of practice
and patience! I have my players do a variety of ball handling
and dribbling drills. Players that are having problems are
given more attention by my assistants. I also have them do
drills where they pass the ball around one leg or the other,
concentrating on the ball being comtrolled by the fingertips.
Players will gradually grasp this concept, and then we
proceed with more movement on our dribbling drills. It may
take some time, but it is a basic concept that every player
must know.

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Use Your Backside

Do you shout "Block out!!!" to your team, only to watch them
turn to get into rebounding position, leave a large gap
between themselves and their opponent, and their opponent gets
the rebound? This is very frustrating to watch. Many players
think that just turning around and seeing their opponent 
they are guarding is enough when blocking out. But it isn't.

You must make contact with your opponent. That is the only 
way to know for sure where your opponent is at and where they
are going to. The best way make contact is with your backside.
Make that initial contact with your backside and you can
essentially seal them off from the basket. Stay low and use
your backside to not let your opponent go around you. A few
rebounds might go long, and your opponent may very well get
them. But the majority of the time, the rebound will either
come to you, or if your opponent does get a hand on it, they
will most likely be called for an over the back foul.

So set a good solid base and make contact with your
opponent. This way, you won't get pushed around or pushed
under the basket, and you'll grab a lot more rebounds. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - The Drop Step

One thing you must realize as a good defensive coach is that
you sometimes have to give up ground in order to get the
advantage back. Did that sound confusing? What I mean is that
you can't always stop a player from making a move to the 
basket. So in this case, you must retreat some to get back
in front of your opponent. The quickest and easiest way to
do this is with the drop step.

Let me give you an example while I explain the drop step.
Let's say your opponent has the ball at the top of the key
and starts to drive to the basket. You see that you can't
just slide straight over, because the player has gotten a 
slight jump on you. If you do, you will either commit a foul
or the player will blow right by you for an easy lay-up.

But this is where the drop step comes into play. To execute
this, you simply take your leg (the leg that is on the side
that the offense is going to), and instead of shuffling
straight across, move this leg back and angle over to stop
the offensive player. You are really picking up your leg and
dropping it back. You are retreating on an angle, yet you
are getting back in position to regain the advantage and stop
the offensive penetration. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Develop All of Your Players

Our team lost a tough game last week. We fought back and
took the lead with about a minute left, only to lose by a
point on a last second shot. Yet after the game, I felt
proud of my players. They are starting to come together as a
team and everyone contributed in one form or another.

But the team we played didn't do this. They had one good 
ballplayer that we just couldn't contain. Part of that was
our weak side help, which we have since corrected. But it
really puzzled me why this coach let this player bring the
ball up the floor and take most of the shots, while the
other players stood around. And when they did get the ball,
they looked like they didn't know what to do with it!

As a veteran coach, I know we will beat this team in the
future. As players advance, one player can't control a game
as much. It takes a team effort, which we are starting to
get from our players. But I couldn't help feel sorry for that
other team. If they all don't learn the basic skills now,
when are they ever going to learn them? 

This is why I always remind the coaches at our school to
develop all of their players. I would rather give up a few
victories at the lower grades. Develop as many players as
you can so that by the time they are in 7th or 8th grade,
you will have a team that understands the game, not just
1 or 2 players. Remember, basketball is a team sport. Work
with all of your players. You'll be pleasantly surprised
how some average players will step forward and mature. That's
great for both themselves and your team! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! Good Luck in 2003!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                     February 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

01/31/2003 ** February 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Don't Forget the Basics 
=> Shooting - Remember to Follow Through 
=> Passing - Use Ball Fakes 
=> Defense - Pointing Technique 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Use Diagrams to Explain 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

My new ebook on defense is available!!! Check it out at:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm

Also, my website has been awarded a "Golden Web Award"!!!
Check it out at the bottom of my site.

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Don't Forget the Basics
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

Well, every team should be into full swing by now! I know
the teams at our school have been playing since November
and will continue until the first week of March. And if you
are like most teams, you have a lot to go over between games,
and not enough practice time. What do you do???

No matter how tempting it is to spend a whole practice
reviewing what went wrong in the last game, or to prepare for
an upcoming game, you as a coach must find time to practice
the "basketball basics": dribbling, passing, shooting, and
defense. The younger the players, the more time you must
devote to the basics. I have found over the years that if
you don't focus on the basics, players will develop bad
habits. These habits get harder to break as a player gets
older. So I spend more time on basic drills, helping to
create a good basketball foundation for future years.

But don't think that I don't review our games! I will take
some time to review what we did well and what we need to work
on. I will then take an area that we need to work on, and 
use some basic drills to get my point across. Our last game,
we didn't throw passes particularly well. So after showing
how I wanted the pass thrown, I put my team through a basic
passing drill, the "star drill". This got them to get their
hands ready and to catch passes and move quickly.

I find this method works well. It helps us review our game
problems and still go back to the basics. By keeping the
drills simple, players not only understand better, but are
able to perform the task better. I do this with shooting,
dribbling and defense too. When we take our time to review
our offensive and defensive game plans, I remind our players
what we need to concentrate on and what we have just worked
on. This method definitely improves their basketball skills
and their understanding of what we are trying to accomplish. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Remember to Follow Through

A very important part of the shooting process that is often
neglected is the follow through. As a player releases the ball,
it should roll off the fingertips and the wrist should snap
through. If not, there won't be any rotation on the ball. I
refer to these shots as a knuckleball, as you can read the
manufacturers name on the ball as it goes through the air! 

A player must make a mental note to perform the follow 
through. I tell my players to act like their hand is 
following the ball right into the basket. By giving the
ball the proper rotation, even a shot that is a little off
will a lot of times spin on the rim and into the basket.
This "shooter's roll" as it is sometimes called is a direct
result of following through. 

So make sure to watch your players as they practice their 
shots. A flat shot or a shot with no rotation can be easily 
corrected with this simple technique. I even have my players
focus on this as they practice their shooting technique
without the ball. I have noticed a lot of improvement by
using this method, as they concentrate on their technique
rather than the ball going in the basket. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Use Ball Fakes

A problem that many grade school players have is
telegraphing their passes. The defender sees exactly where
they are looking, and steps into the passing lane to steal
the ball. This leads to a lot of frustration for the 
offensive player, and a breakaway layup for the defense!

I work with my players a lot on this problem. The most
effective way to handle this is by using ball fakes. I
tell my players to keep the defense off balance. A simple
look away, or a ball fake to another player will keep the
defense honest. This works especially well if you are 
having problems getting the ball to the wing positions.
A ball fake will draw the defenders away from your intended
target. You can fake a pass the post or the opposite wing.
If you can burn the defense with this once or twice, they
will think twice before they cheat out again. Then you can
get into your offensive series the way you had planned! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - The Pointing Technique

As you know, my teams play man-to-man defense. I can't
stress enough how well this helps them to learn the basics
of defense. They are then prepared to play any time of other
defense, whether be a straight zone or a matchup zone.

The main point I stress to my players is keeping track of
the player they are guarding. Players sometimes have a
tendency to turn their back on the player they are guarding
because they are only paying attention to the ball. But as
coaches, we know this can't happen.

I have my team use what is called the "pointing technique".
This involves the players who are not guarding the player
with the ball. It simply involves pointing one hand at the
player with the ball and one hand at the player they are
guarding. When done correctly, this forces the player to
keep track of both, and keep them both in his sight. It leads
to a better defensive effort and less players getting loose
for an easy shot. I stress this whenever we are doing any
2 on 2 drills, and even during any srimmaging. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Use a Diagram to Explain Plays

I have found over the years that players understand plays
and drills better when they can visualize them. I think most
people are like that. Yet I still see many coaches who don't
use an erasable board or a notepad to diagram plays before
or during a game. Is it any wonder that the players don't
follow the coach's instructions?

I always use an erasable board and marker. It comes in
handy before the game and during timeouts. Heck, my 
assistants even use it when talking to a player that we 
have taken out of the game. Showing the player exactly where
they should line up on offense or defense leaves no doubt
and no room for a misunderstanding. 

If you don't have a board, a pen and paper will work just
as well. Even a piece of chalk and a board will do. 
Anything to help your players comprehend what you want and
get an advantage on the court! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                        March 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

02/28/2003 ** March 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Keep it Fresh to Keep Players Attention 
=> Shooting - Free Throws 
=> Dribbling - Protect the Ball 
=> Rebounding - Remember to Extend and Jump 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - End of Season Drills 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the simple and easy way to teach your players to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

*** Also, I have received a lot of requests for past issues
of the monthly ezine. So I have added an Archives page
to post past issues! Go to the "Free Resources" page and
click on the Archives link to see issues from 2002. ***

*** Last note: The Combo Pack sale of all 5 ebooks will be
expiring on March 15. If you haven't purchased the set
for $19.95 yet, now's the time to do it! The price of the
Combo Pack will be increasing after March 15. Join the
many satisfied coaches who have purchased my ebooks,
whether you will use them this season or to get ready
for next season! *** 

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Keep it Fresh to Keep Your Players Attention
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

I can't believe it's March already! It seems like we just
started practicing and playing games, and if your school is
like mine, we will finish our season by the middle of March.
I guess time flies when you're having fun! True, there are
points during the season that seem to drag, but for the most
part, basketball season always goes by too fast for me.

Just as there are points that make it seem like the season
will never end for coaches, there are also times like that
for players too. Whether it be the winter blues or too much
homework, even the best of players have some days where they
just aren't mentally with it on the court. 

So what's a coach to do? What I like to do this last 2-3
weeks is to give my players something new. Whether it be a
new drill or a new play or a new press, just something
different to make them think and focus. All players like to
learn new things on the court. Some fresh content is just
the thing for that final push of the season.

Something else I like to do is have them do things out of
the ordinary. You usually only scrimmage at the end of 
practice? Why not do it near the beginning! Have contests
on shooting or on running sets of lines (ladders). It might
be just what your team needs: a refreshing break that will
get them back on track! And a player that is alert and 
thinking will pay much better attention to what you as a
coach are instructing on the court. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Free Throws

With everything that must be gone over, your offense, 
defense, press, press break, etc., one area that I see being
overlooked is free throw shooting. Yet at crunch time during
a game, it can be the most important. Let's spend a few
minutes looking at this area.

Free throws are an area that I make sure to find time for
in our schedule. Usually before the half way point and then
again at the end we will divide into groups and shoot. I
try to have my players go through a pre-shot routine that
they go through the same way each time. I believe free throws
are nothing more than repetition, and once you get your
rhythm down pat, you should shoot them the same way each time.
That's the way all of the great free throw shooters perform.
If you pay close attention, you'll see that they shoot the
same way every shot. That's what I get my players to work
toward.

So spend some time each practice working with your players
on free throw shooting form and technique. Also, try to put
them in a game situation where there are players lined up
around the lane. Teach them to block out all distractions
and focus on the shot. All of this together will make your
team hit a higher percentage of free throws. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Protect the Ball

I was recently watching another team at our school play a 
game. Things were going OK until the opponent started to 
pressure our point guard. At that point, the other team stole
the ball from him three straight times. What was going on 
here?

This guard, as other players I have watched, was failing to
protect the ball. He was putting the ball right in front of
the defender, and the defender was more than happy to take
it. He needed to use his body to shield the ball.

There is a simple solution to this problem. First, you
must establish what I call the "dribble pocket". This is the
area that you use to dribble the ball in. You can create a 
dribble pocket just by moving your ball-side foot back so 
your toe is at the same level as the heel on the non-ball
side. Keep your feet shoulder width apart. Use this area
to dribble the ball in. That way the ball is closer to your
body and not right in front of you. Your body is now more
between the defender and the ball, giving more protection to
the ball. If the defender does goes for it, they are 
probably going to commit a foul. That will cause them to
back off. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Remember to Extend and Jump

Besides teaching players to block out, you must also
instruct your players about going for the ball. When the
shot is taken, we all know that if we are on defense, we
must find a player and block him out. 

Then what about when the ball comes off the rim? This is
where I see players get confused. They continue to hold 
their player out, instead of going for the rebound. This is
where I emphasize to my players that they need to now jump
and extend to the ball, grabbing the rebound with both hands.
If they have blocked out correctly, their player should not
be able to get around them. They should have a spot to jump
and extend to get the rebound, and the only way their player
they were guarding can get to it is by committing a foul.

This is sometimes a hard concept for players to grasp at
first. It's a split second decision to go from blocking out
to grabbing the rebound. But like with everything else in
basketball, practice will help make it an easy transition. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - End of Season Drills

As you approach the end of your season, I would encourage
you to give your players some things to work on during the
summer. I take my last practice and go through with each
player on what I feel they need to improve on. I also give
them some basic drills to work on. These usually involve
things like dribbling, passing, free throws, shooting on the
move, etc. 

I stress to my players that just 30-60 minutes of basketball
a week will help them improve. Many of my players will play
more than that during summer leagues and camps. But it means
so much if they can dedicate that small amount of time to
the basic drills that I give them to help them improve for
next season. And whether I will be coaching them or not, I
want them to be prepared! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                       April 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

03/31/2003 ** April 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - What You can Learn from the NCAA Tourn. 
=> Shooting - Be Ready to Shoot 
=> Passing - Lead the Receiver 
=> Defense - Keep Training Once the Season Ends 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Review Your Season 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the simple and easy way to teach your players to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Have you checked out the Archives yet???
Go to the "Free Resources" page and
click on the Archives link to see past issues from 2002. 

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, What You Can Learn From the NCAA Tournament
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

I love to watch grade school, high school and college
basketball. So this is a great time of the year for me, as
the NCAA men's and women's tournaments kick off. It can also
be a valuable learning tool for us coaches. Let me explain.

While watching the games, I like to note what defense a
team is playing and how they are playing it. How do they
defend the strong side and weak side of the floor. Does
everyone block out when a shot goes up. Little things like
this can give you as a coach ideas to use with your team to
improve their defense.

On offense, I like to see what plays a team's running.
I like to watch what out of bounds plays are run, and how
they set up and cut. I especially pay attention to what the
players away from the ball are doing. How are they moving to
get open, or where are they going to set a screen.

I also like to watch the coaches. How do they interact with
the players and what kind of substitution methods they use.
I also like when they have the live audio in the coaches
huddle during a timeout. I like to see if what the coach has
diagrammed on his board is what gets run on the floor!

There are many ideas that you can get from watching these
games. True, some stuff is advanced and will not apply to
your team. But there is plenty of simple stuff for you as a 
youth basketball coach. 

The only thing I don't like to watch is the coaches getting
on the officials. That stuff unfortunately trickles down to
our level as some coaches see this on TV and try to 
duplicate it. That's not what youth sports is about. But 
that's another story for another time.

So enjoy the tournament and gain some valuable insight into
the game of basketball. It's a great way to spend the 
beginning of Spring before all of the outdoors chores must
be done. Relax and have a good time!


------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Be Ready to Shoot

How many times this season have you watched a player
receive a pass, and they are the most surprised person on the
court. I always tell my players, you must be prepared to
receive the ball anytime that you are on offense. When you
are on offense, you should want and expect the ball to come
your way. You must be involved.

The other aspect of being prepared is that when you receive
a pass, you must be in a position to shoot. At least to be
able to shoot if you are open. If you are not ready to
receive the ball and get into shooting position quickly, a
defender will be on you. 

One thing I like to do is to get the shooter, if he is
going to be in shooting position, to step toward the pass with
the foot closest to the basket. The shooter can then use this
foot to pivot on and square up to the basket. This step, along
with having the hands ready, will give the shooter the split
second they need to get off a good shot. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Lead the Receiver

When we are going through our passing drills, I stress
to my players about leading a player who is in motion. It
only makes sense. If one of our players is cutting toward
the basket, whether it is in our offense or on a fastbreak,
the ball must be thrown in front of them in order for them
to receive the pass. Throw it where they are going to, not
where they are currently at.

A simple drill to use is to set up 3 lanes going down the 
court. You can use bounce passes or chest passes, I like the
bounce pass myself. Have the players jogs down the court as
the pass the ball from lane to lane. This will give them
the idea of leading the receiver.

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Keep Training Once the Season Ends

Training for defense is something that can be done over
the summer months. How can you practice your defense by
yourself? Well, what you want to do is to build up your
stamina, speed, and jumping ability.

One way is by running. This you can do around a court, 
around the block, wherever you want. A few times a week
will build up your body for next season.

To increase your speed, try running sprints. You can even
do this in your driveway or your front sidewalk. This will
enable you to increase your foot speed.

To increase your jumping ability, you can work on jumping
to grab rebounds, jumping rope, or jumping back and forth
over a line. You can also use ankle weights, which will
really help your jumping ability. 

Getting your players to do any or all of these things
will help them come next season. They aren't glamorous, but
they are the little things that will help push a player
and their team to the top!

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Review Your Season

Since my season is finished, I have sat down with my
assistants and critiqued the year. We review things like:

What areas did we do well in and what areas didn't?
What could we have done different as coaches to help our
players?
What will our coaching plans be for next season?

Though they are 3 simple questions, we can usually spend
1 -2 hours going over everything. I always like to get this
input. I feel it not only helps our teams, but it also helps
me to be a better coach. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any comments or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                        May 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

04/30/2003 ** May 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Dealing with a Parent Conflict 
=> Passing - Step to the Pass 
=> Dribbling - Protect the Ball, but Look Ahead
=> Rebounding - Anticipate Where it Will Go 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Plan for a Summer League 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the secrets to teaching young players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Get your team to play tough man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Dealing with a Parent Conflict
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

No matter what you do and how conscientious you are about
dealing with all of your players equally, you are bound to
get a complaint from a parent at some point in your
coaching career. Most parent's are courteous about asking a
question, and just want to get an explanation about why
something is occuring. Why is my son/daughter not playing
as much as some of the other players? Why doesn't my son/
daughter get to start more games? I have no problem sitting
down and talking to these parents. Most times, a simple
explanation will put their minds at ease. It's usually
because they are interpretting a situation differently than
I am. Almost all parents are understanding and reasonable.

But more often these days, I see and hear about coaches
getting yelled at. The parent's come to them in a
confrontational tone, demanding that things change, or 
commenting on the coach's ability to coach. Instead of
letting the coach explain why something was done, these
people want to vent their frustration on the coach.

As you can probably see, this second situation will not
solve anything. When a parent comes up to me and we can
have an adult conversation, things almost always work out
and everyone goes home satisfied. But when a parent comes
up to me ready to rumble, I know that this person can't
be reasoned with at this time.

So what is a coach to do? I never talk to a parent when
they are in this frame of mind. I tell them to cool off
and we will set up a time to sit down and talk. Before or
right after a game is not the time for these conversations!
Emotions are usually running high at these times, so I
want the parent and myself to be in the right frame of mind
to discuss whatever is bothering them and/or their child.

I could go on and on about this subject, because it is
increasingly becoming a problem in all youth sports, not
just basketball. If you haven't already done so, I would
strongly encourage you to download and read my report:
"Coaching Tips on Dealing With Parents" which is available
on www.scoremorehoops.com under the "Free Resources" link.
You'll be prepared for these situations if they should 
ever arise.


------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Step to the Pass

I hope many of you were able to watch the NCAA tournament.
It was great to see teams like Syracuse and Marquette come
so far during the year. Teamwork will do that for you!

The one thing I did notice was some players not stepping to
receive a pass. These players would be open for a split
second, but instead of moving to get the pass, they waited
with their hands out. And guess what? Many times those
passes were stolen! 

Stress to your team the importance of moving to receive the
pass. A simple demonstration I like to show my players is
to have someone defend me from receiving a pass. On the
first pass that is thrown to me, I don't step to receive it.
The pass always gets stolen. The next pass I step to receive.
The defender almost always knocks into me, committing a foul.
This simple demo should remind them to move to the ball. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Protect the Ball, but Look Ahead

When teaching players to dribble, always remember to stress
that they need to protect the ball, but keep their body and
head facing forward. It's OK to turn slightly to protect
the ball. But turn too much to the sideline, and you have
just eliminated your vision of half of the court.

So have your players work on dribbling in place with the
ball side foot back to form the dribble pocket. Make sure 
they point their feet forward and not to the sideline. This
will help them not only to know where the defense is at, but
where their open teammates are also. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Anticipate Where it Will Go

Did you ever notice that some players just always seem to
be in the right place at the right time? An errant pass or a
rebound will always seem to end up in their hands. Is it just
luck? I don't think so, I think they just know how to
anticipate.

Rebounding is good place to anticipate. Whether you are on
offense or defense, when a shot is about to go up, you need
to get into rebounding position. That's half the battle of it.
But you also need to know where the ball is going. Here's a
simple rule that I've always followed. It works most of the
time, but not all.

When a shot is taken from the side, the rebound will most
likely come off the opposite side. Also, the farther out a 
shot is taken, the farther and higher the ball will bounce.
So don't go running right near the rim when your teammate
shoots a 15 foot jump shot!

These points will help you to rebound on the offensive and
defensive end. Like I said, it won't happen like this all of
the time. Some shots may just brush the rim and fall straight
down. But learn to anticipate and you'll start guessing right
more and more often. And it's always better to move and get
into position than it is to stand there and do nothing. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Plan for a Summer League

I know from receiving email from many of you that we have
coaches that participate in a wide variety of programs. Some
are school teams, some are club teams, some are instructional
teams. If you know what team you will be coaching for next
season, setting up a summer league program can be very
beneficial.

Kids these days have many sports to play, so it's not always
easy to get everyone together. But entering your team in a
summer league can really help your team in learning to play
together. It also lets you experiment with some different
options on offense and defense.

If this isn't possible, getting your team together for an
informal practice in the gym is another option. These can be
once a week or whenever possible. It keeps basketball skills
on the mind of your players without a big commitment on their
part.

Letting your players know about basketball camps is also 
good. It keeps a player working on their game, and most camps
will focus on the basics.

So check with your organization to see what you are allowed
to do. If you can do some of these things, take advantage of
it. We usually have our 7th and 8th graders participate in a
summer league. We don't worry about wins and losses, just
on players making an improvement. Even if you can't do any of
these things, remind your players to work on their basic
skills over the summer. Then they will be ready to go when
basketball starts again in the fall. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                    June 2003

------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

05/31/2003 ** June 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - The Positive NBA Effect 
=> Passing - Throw Hard Passes 
=> Dribbling - Make a Game Out of It
=> Shooting - Go Straight Up 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Jes-soft Software 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the secrets to teaching young players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Get your team to play tough man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** In a few month's, my ebooks will also be available on CD 
and in print form!!! I will be notifying all subscribers
when this will be ready!!! *** 

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, The Positive NBA Effect
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

I have never been a big fan of the NBA. Sure, when I was
growing up, I thought it was great. I would be out in my 
yard, acting like Dr. J. and shooting the sky hook like
Kareem. But when I became involved with coaching, I quickly
saw that the NBA game was too much "one on one". There was
no team concept, just a lot of "run and gun", the first one
down can shoot. It really turned me off. How could I teach
my young players the team concept when they were being
exposed to the NBA on TV?

But times have started to change, at least this year they
have. Teams like Sacramento, Dallas, San Antonio and New
Jersey have built their teams with an All-Star or two, plus
a deep bench and supporting cast. As San Antonio showed by
beating the Lakers, a good team can beat a few good
individuals.

So I have actually found myself watching more of the 
playoffs than I normally would have. I have been seeing
some good defense, especially help-side defense, as well
as players throwing some great passes and not being 
selfish. A player that score twenty points one game may
not score in double-digits the next, but he will probably
dish out some assists and play some defense. Whatever needs
to be done to help their team win!

I hope this has a trickle down effect to the lower levels.
As young players like to see 3 point shots and thunderous
dunks, I hope they are seeing that a player is valuable
whether they score a lot or not. I hope they see that the
teamwork concept will help make their own team better. And
I hope they bring that attitude with them in the fall!!! 



------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Throw Hard Passes

I always teach my players to throw hard passes. A soft pass,
or "lazy pass" as I like to call them, will many times get
stolen. Even if it doesn't get stolen, it usually throws off
the timing of the next event. A player cutting toward the
basket for a lay-up will be thrown off if he has to slow up
to receive the ball. It also gives the defense more time to
react.

How do I get my players to do this? I use a few different
ways. First, If they throw the pass the right way and finish
with the thumbs down, they will be throwing a decent pass.
So stress the correct technique. Second, once your players
have all learned to catch the ball, move them back a foot or
two at a time. This increased distance during a passing drill
where they stand across from each other will force them to
throw a harder pass in order to get it to their teammate.
Third, use a heavy (weighted) ball during passing drills, 
like the "Star Drill". It will make a normal ball feel like
a feather when you put the regular basketball back in!

Of course, base all of these on the age and ability of your
players. You don't want to see anyone get hit in the nose
with a bullet pass. Take it slow and get them to catch the
ball correctly before proceeding. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Make a Game Out of It

I have found over the years that you must change things up
to keep a kid's attention. Even though dribbling is an
important basketball skill, kids get bored if they are just
dribbling up and down the court.

So change things up for them. I like to set up an obstacle
course with cones for them to dribble around, or divide the
players up and have a contest to see which team can dribble
faster and under control. I keep them under control so it's
not disorganized, yet I'm getting them to practice a valuable
skill. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Go Straight Up

Players are sometimes in such a hurry to get a shot off 
that they don't take the precious second to jump stop and
go straight up. By doing this, their body is going away from
the basket. So if they haven't compensated for this, the
shot is probably not going to go in.

Shooting on the move is a difficult concept for younger
players to grasp. But it is an essential one. Teach your
players to plant their foot closest to the basket, square
their body to the basket, then jump straight up in the air.
This will make them a more accurate shooter, and keep them
in position to get their own rebound in case the shot is
missed. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Jes-soft Software 

A valuable piece of software that I use is one that creates
plays. I use a FREE software product from Jes-soft, which
can be found at www.jes-soft.com 

This software has become a great resource. I can lay out
offenses and defenses, out of bounds plays and even drills.
I keep these documented not only for myself but for other
coaches in our program and our players.

If you get a chance, download this FREE software and give
it a try. They even have it available for other sports too.
They also have drills and plays that you can view, some
are animated sequences. Check it out, it's pretty cool! 
The website again is: www.jes-soft.com 


------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------



                     July 2003


------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

06/30/2003 ** July 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Don't Go Overboard 
=> Shooting - The One-Handed Solution Method 
=> Rules of the Game - Check for Changes 
=> Rebounding - Some Jumping Exercises 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Some Whacky Definitions 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the secrets to teaching young players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Get your team to play tough man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** I am very busy finalizing the CD and printed version.
Both of these will contain all of my current books, plus
some free resources from my website. The printed version
will be in black-and-white in order to keep the cost
down. It will be nicely bound, and the printing is very
clear. The CD version PDF files will have color photos.
I have gotten good reviews on both of these from coaches
that I have shown. I will let you know as soon as they
are both ready. Subscribers will get the first 
opportunity, and I will be giving you a special discount!

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Don't Go Overboard
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
In the May 2003 issue of my newsletter, I mentioned about
planning for a Summer League. I really love the game of
basketball and really believe that players need to practice
the skills a lot in order to improve. Not picking up a 
basketball from April until November will not help a player's
game at all. It's like starting over again.

But I would also caution you not to go overboard during the
off-season. Even the most basketball-crazed people need a
break. Demanding too much practice and too many summer
league games can start making basketball a job instead of a
game. This is how players get burned out at a young age and
become disinterested.

Does that mean that you shouldn't do anything during the
summer? Of course not, but do it in moderation. Realize
that your player's are still kids. Once or twice a week,
or even every 2 weeks, is plenty to polish their skills. 
They need time away from organized sports to just be kids. 
Then as it gets closer to basketball season, your players
will have worked on their game, but will also be fresh for
the upcoming season. 


------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - The One-Handed Solution Method 

Whenever I am working with a player who is having trouble
with their shot, I always have them move close to the basket
and shoot with just one hand. This will usually help them
get their technique back in order.

Why does this work? I have noticed over the years that 
players will move farther and farther from the basket to
shoot. There comes a point where in order to get the ball
to the basket, the player will change something in their
shooting motion. It could be the position of their hands,
a turning of the shoulders or a wind-up motion to get some
extra power. A quick refresher course close to the basket
will get that player back on the right track. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rules of the Game - Check for Changes

One thing I do before any basketball season is to check on
any rule changes. This way I am not caught off-guard by
any changes, and I can make sure to make notes to tell my
players.

Whether you are a new coach or an experienced coach, you
need to know the rules of the game. Knowing the rules will
help you teach your players, and will help you in any
discussions with officials or other coaches.

Knowing the rules will also save you from any embarrassment
on the bench. I learned a long time ago that if I was not
positive about a ruling, I should just be quiet. No sense
arguing if I don't know what I'm talking about!

I once saw a coach during a game constantly screaming,
"Three seconds, three seconds!!!". He was up and down the
sidelines. The referee finally gave him a T, but the coach
still protested about three seconds in the lane. The referee
finally got this coach to understand that the offense could
only be in the lane for three seconds. This coach thought it
applied to the defense too! After he figured out that he
was wrong, the coach sat on the bench quiety for the rest of
the game. I'm sure he read the rules of basketball after
that incident! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Some Jumping Exercises

To increase jumping ability, a player can perform a few 
different exercises. One is to stand parallel to the basket,
about 2 or 3 feet away and off to one side of the rim, and
throw the ball off the backboard. The player should 
immediately follow by jumping with both hands extended to
get the rebound. The player should jump as high as they can
each time. Squaring up and passing to an outlet can also
be added.

Another drill to increase your jumping ability to rebound
is to simply jump back and forth across the sideline
without touching it. Under a coach's supervision, and when
a player gets used to this exercise, a basketball might be
used to jump over. This is for older grade school players,
and only under supervision so the player doesn't get hurt.

Another thing that can be done is to use 5 pound ankle 
weights. The above can be done wearing the weights. Once 
again, a coach should supervise this so the player doesn't
hurt themselves. 

Any type of drill that will get a player used to jumping
quickly off the ground will help them rebound. As I have
mentioned before, body positioning is most important, but
then a player must jump to get the rebound. These drills will
help them achieve that goal. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Some Whacky Definitions 

I'm always on the look out for new basketball information,
especially on the internet. Here's a webpage that has some
funny (yet slightly true) basketball terms. Here's a few:

Team Player - A Player who passes to me
Ball Hog - A Player who wants me to pass the ball to him
Good Shot - Any shot I can get off

Check out the rest of them at the following website:

www.sass.sd83.bc.ca/students/9701/w3ejg5.htm

It gave me a chuckle, and reminds me to not take things
so seriously all the time!

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                   August 2003


------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

07/31/2003 ** August 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Prepare Info for the Parents 
=> Shooting - Stress Form Over Just Making the Shot 
=> Dribbling - Focus on the Weak Hand 
=> Defense - No Bunny Hop 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Keep the Drills Short 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the secrets to teaching young players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Get your team to play tough man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** This is the last chance for you to get the "Score More
Hoops" series on CD or print form at a discounted price.
For my newsletter subscribers only, that's $21.95 for
the CD version, or $27.95 for the printed black and white
version. Also, you get my new "basketball guide" with
over 50 basketball terms defined for FREE! Send a check
or money order for the appropriate amount to:

Pavlovic Publications
1128 Gillian St.
Lemont, IL 60439

(Illinois residents, please add 7 3/4% sales tax) 


------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Prepare Info for the Parents
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
How can it possibly be August already??? It seems that my
boys just got out of school for summer vacation, and in a 
month, they will be back to school. That also means that
only a few short months until basketball starts again. That's
the part that I like.

One thing that I like that the teacher's at our school do,
is to send out at the beginning of the year what they are
looking to accomplish. They inform you what will be expected
from each student, and what they will learn over the course
of the year.

I try to do this for basketball also. Whether it be with
a handout with team rules and practice times, or a sit-down
meeting with the parents' of all my players, I want them to
know my philosophy as well as my expectations for everyone.
I have found this works well, because I can hit on problem
areas that parents in the past might have misunderstood, and
I can explain them better and in more detail. This approach
leads to a lot fewer surprises for the parents, which means
they are happier with our program. This leads to a more
satisfying season for everyone involved! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Stress Form Over Just Making the Shot 

For young players, the way the ball is shot is more 
important than if it goes in. Why? Because bad habits are
easier to break at a younger age than if the player is at
junior high. Having a player shoot using the correct form
might not pay dividends right away, but it will help that
player in the long run. 

Too many times I see coaches ignore incorrect shooting form.
"The ball goes in", is what they say. And that is true,
sometimes the shot will go in. If you shoot 100 shots inside
the lane, some are bound to go in, right? As a coach, I
want my players to learn to shoot the right way. It will
make them much more accurate as they mature.

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Focus on the Weak Hand

As soon as my practices start, I will refresh my ballplayers
about ballhandling. Basic dribbling drills will be on the
agenda. I know even if they have been practicing over the
summer, I will need for them to work on their weak hand. For
most players, that is their left hand.

Why is this important? I want them to be able to handle the
ball well with either hand. This makes them very hard to
guard. They can't be forced to one side of the court or the
other, or forced into a trap.

So go through your normal dribbling drills, but spend some
time having all your players work with their weak hand.
Have them keep their head up and use their fingertips, as
well as bouncing the ball with some authority. You will be
amazed at how quickly they improve. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - No Bunny Hop

Shuffling and defense go hand-in-hand. In order to be an
effective defender, you must stay low to the ground and
take short, quick steps. Don't let the legs come together
and hit your feet together. That's what I call the Bunny Hop,
because it looks like the player is hopping along when they
do this.

To have your players avoid the Bunny Hop, have them
practice shuffling back and forth across the free throw lane.
You can put 3 or 4 of them together at a time. Have them
stay low and touch the lines with their feet. You can
start them at 15 seconds, then increase the time as they
get better. This drill has helped our players a lot, as they
can translate this small drill into their full court and
half court defense. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Keep the Drills Short 

No matter if your players are just starting or are in junior
high, their attention span is not very long. To get the most
out of your drills, keep them short and focused on a 
specific goal. No more than 8-10 minutes should be spent on a
drill once the players are familiar with it.

Take for example the Star Drill. Yes, the first time you
show this to your team, it will take some time. But the
times after that, they should know it. You can go full
blast, telling them to concentrate on catching and receiving
a pass. By getting them to focus on this one goal, you will
accomplish more than if you try to add a lot of things. The
more you add, the more likely it is that some players will
get confused. 

Also, take a few seconds if you see the same
mistakes being made. It's better to correct the mistake
than to let it become a bad habit. Just keep them focused,
work toward accomplishing your goal, and then move on to
the next drill. It will keep your players fresh and alert.

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


             September 2003


------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

08/31/2003 ** September 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Setting Up a Practice Schedule 
=> Shooting - The Left-Handed Layup 
=> Passing - The Speed Passing Drill 
=> Rebounding - The Tip Drill 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Use the Internet 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn the secrets to teaching young players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Get your team to play tough man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** My new "basketball guide" with over 50 basketball terms 
defined is now available! This is a great resource for
coaches, players, spouses, or anyone new to the game.
To purchase, send a check or money order for $2.50 to:

Pavlovic Publications
Basketball Guide
1128 Gillian St.
Lemont, IL 60439

(Illinois residents, please add 7 3/4% sales tax) 

** Also, I have updated the newsletter archives. You can
now review up through June of 2003. Go to the "Free
Resources" section, then click on the "Newsletter
Archives" link. 


------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Setting Up a Practice Schedule
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

One thing I encourage all coaches to do is to write down
your practice plan before each practice. It doesn't matter
what it's written on: scrap paper, looseleaf, a napkin. Just
write it down and go over it with your assistant coaches
before the players take the floor.

It's very important to do this step. Why? First, There won't
be any downtime during your practice. I've seen practices
where the coaches decide as they go about what to do next.
This not only wastes time, but gives players the opportunity
to talk and goof around. It takes them out of a practice
frame of mind, and they lose their concentration. Second,
it helps the assistant coaches to be prepared. There then
shouldn't be any time spent during practice telling your
assistants what is next and what you want them to do. Third,
it helps you to make sure that you haven't forgotten to go
over something. Put a big star by things that you MUST go
over and you won't forget. Practices go by so fast that
it's easy to forget an important drill or going over
something on offense or defense.

Setting up a schedule does take some time. I will usually
sit down with my assistant coaches and get their input
after a practice, then use that input to help me set up the
next practice. When I sit down with them to go over a 
practice schedule, I will then make adjustments based on
their thoughts. Assistant coaches are great at catching the
details!

Next month, I will be going into more detail about what 
exactly to put into your practice schedule. How long should
you spend on offense, defense, the basics etc.??? I'll tell
you how I handle it, and how you can adapt my ways to fit
your practices. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - The Left-Handed Layup 

Since most young players are right handed, the left hand
layup is foreign to them. That is until they start some
sort of structured training. Or if they are naturally left
handed to begin with! I always want my players to be able
to shoot both left and right handed layups equally well as
they progress through our program.

What makes the left hand layup so hard? With most players
being right handed, it is a big adjustment for them to shoot
the ball with the left hand. As you know, the left hand
layup is shot by pushing the ball up with the left hand,
while jumping off of the right foot. Since they don't spend
a lot of time shooting with the left hand, it is weak. So
the only way to improve it is to kep practicing with it. The
same would be done with a naturally left handed player, but
they would work on the right handed layup.

The biggest obstacle to the left handed layup is frustration.
When a player can't do something well quickly, it leads to
the "I can't" syndrome. I couldn't tell you how many times a
player has told me "I can't" when I try to show them the
correct way of shooting this! 

So I stress to my players that I don't expect them to do it
perfect right off the bat. I strongly excourage them for 
using their left hand, even if the ball doesn't hit the
backboard. As they practice and get older and stronger, it
becomes second nature to them. It helps them with their
ball handling, and they don't have to worry about the ball
being blocked or knocked away as they drive for a left 
handed layup at a crucial point of the game. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - The Speed Passing Drill

Strong passes and leading a receiver are two important 
parts of passing. In this drill, you can work on both.

To set up this drill, you need 3 players on the floor. 2 are
standing on the sidelines, at each of the free throw lines
extended. The third is in the jump circle. Everyone else is
in a single file line out of bounds behind one of the endlines.
They are going to run in a straight line down the floor,
passing to the first outlet, receiving a pass back, then
passing to the middle person, receiving a pass back, then
passing to the last outlet and getting a pass back and shooting
a layup. The next person would then go through the line,
and your 3 outlets should be substituted every few minutes.

This is a great passing drill. Some things to stress include
making accurate passes, having the outlets lead the passer as
they go down the court, and having the passer run through this
in a straight line. When they get good at this, you can do
either bounce or chest passes and set up another set of
outlets on the other side of the floor, so players can do
2 sets at a time. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - The Tip Drill

To work on my team's rebounding skills, I like to do the
Tip Drill. Simply set your players up in a single file line
facing the basket. They should be off to one side of the 
backboard and a few feet back. The object is to throw the
ball off of the backboard and have the person behind you
grab the rebound and put it back off the backboard. The
drill keeps going until we get to a number without dropping
the ball, or a time limit. As a player finished their turn,
they simply go to the back of the line to start again.

The points to stress in this drill include having the 
players jump to get the rebound with their hands extended,
keeping the ball above their head when they catch it, and
putting it back off the backboard in a way that the player
behind them will be able to get the rebound. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Use the Internet 

You as a coach are ahead of most coaches - you already use
the internet! There is so much information available that
you should never be at a loss for reading material.

What things do I use it for? There are sites out there that
list different drills, offense and defenses, out of bounds
plays. There is software out there to help you keep track
of stats. There are forums to help get answers from other
coaches or to find tournaments for your teams.

When I am looking for something specific, I will go to
a search enginge (like Google) and type in a word or phrase.
The best sites I find I will save into my Favorites list for
future reference. It's a great way to stay one step ahead
of the competition! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------



                October 2003


------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

09/30/2003 ** October 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Setting Up a Practice Schedule (Part 2) 
=> Shooting - Use the Backboard on Layups 
=> Dribbling - Be Flexible 
=> Defense - Stretch Out First 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Meet Your Team 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
Get ready for the upcoming season!

Learn my unique way of teaching players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Teach your team how to play man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** My new "basketball guide" with over 50 basketball terms 
defined is now available! This is a great resource for
coaches, players, spouses, or anyone new to the game.
To purchase, send a check or money order for $2.50 to:

Pavlovic Publications
Basketball Guide
1128 Gillian St.
Lemont, IL 60439

(Illinois residents, please add 7 3/4% sales tax) 

** Also, I have updated the newsletter archives. You can
now review up through June of 2003. Go to the "Free
Resources" section, then click on the "Newsletter
Archives" link. 


------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Setting Up a Practice Schedule (Part 2)
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------
As I talked about last month, I feel it is imperative that a
coach sets up a practice schedule each time their team meets.
But what do we put in that schedule? That's the question I
am going to tackle this month.

The first thing we need to know is how long our practice slot
will be. From corresponding with some of you, I know that
ranges from 1 hour to 3 hours per session. Obviously, the
shorter the time slot, the less that we can go over. And the
less time we have, the more efficiently we must use it. It's
better in that case to focus on a few main points and get
your players well developed in those areas than to go over
a bunch of stuff that they don't have time to learn fully.

So what do we do during a practice? Well, we must go over
the basics first. I have my players stretch out, then we
do some dribbling, passing, maybe some conditioning drills.
I want them to be proficient in dribbling and passing, 
because those two skills will be used throughout their
careers. I also add in some shooting drills, using dribbling,
(like full court layups), and passing, (like the speed
passing drill). I will also add in some defensive drills to
keep my players sharp and in shape. I would estimate that 
this takes between 1/3 and 1/2 of my practice time, 
depending on the age level and the time of the season. 
I will spend even more times on the basics at the lower 
grades, just as I will spend more time on the basics with 
a junior high team at the beginning of the season.

The other time at my practice I will spend going over our
things such as offense, defense, out of bounds plays, press,
press break, free throws, rebounding, and anything else we
neew to know! I won't go over all of these at each practice,
that would put my players on information overload. Instead,
I go over 1 or 2 areas at early season practices, then
review in the areas that we are weak as the season go along.

I also make sure that my schedule is flexible. If I see we
are struggling at shooting, then I will devote more time in
the schedule for shooting review and practice. If we need
more time for the basics, then I will assign more time for
that. As I said before, I would rather have my players 
perform the basics well, than to give them 2 or 3 offenses
that they aren't capable of running. My assistants will help
make those decisions with me on what we should review.

This is the way I set up my practice, and you can adapt this
to your situation. Either way, I don't think there is a 
right way and a wrong way to set up a practice schedule. The
important thing is to make sure you set up some kind of
plan!

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - Use the Backboard on Layups 

One of the most frustrating things is to see a player alone
on a fastbreak layup, and have them put up a shot that rolls
off the rim. An easy opportunity that we come away empty!

I always stress to my players to use the backboard. By doing
this on layups and shots from the block, the player gets into
the routine and recognizes the spot they need to hit within
the square. It then makes the shot virtually automatic.

Some players like to look cool though. They see older players
shoot finger rolls over the front of the rim, or get high
enough to just drop the ball in without using the backboard.
But at the grade school age, it's very important for them
to realize that they are not at that level, at least not yet.
They need to make sure the ball goes into the basket. Using
the backboard for what it was intended will help your team
with those easy baskets. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Dribbling - Be Flexible

To make a quick move off of the dribble, a player must be
slightly bent and ready to go. They can't stand straight up
and expect to get the jump on a defender. They must be 
in a flexible position to make that quick first step and
blow by the defender.

How do you get your players to do this? Get them to receive
a pass and square up. Their knees should be slightly bent,
and the ball in a position so that they can pass, shoot, or
dribble. They must also be slightly relaxed. Then without a
defender between them and the basket, have them quickly
drive in for a layup. Once your team gets the hang of this,
add a defender. Having the dribbler ready to go will help
your offense run even better. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Stretch Out First

At the beginning of all of my practices and even before 
games, I always have my players stretch out. First of all,
it helps them to get their muscles prepared before we do
any drills. This will help reduce the number of pulled
muscles and related injuries. Second, I like to have players
stretch before a game to get rid of some of that built up
nervous energy. I have noticed that the stretching time
gives them something to concentrate on, rather than sitting
nad waiting for our game time. It also gives them some time
to reflect on the upcoming game and what they need to do
on the court. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Meet Your Team 

It's hard to believe that the basketball season is upon us!
Don't get me wrong, I'm very excited to get started. It's
my favorite time of the year.

At my first practice, I will meet each of my players. I 
will go over their names multiple times. Players respond
better and feel more part of a team if you refer to them by
their correct name. I will find out a little about their
playing experience, and will tell them about my coaching
background.

Also at one of my first practices, I will meet with the
parents. I will introduce myself to each set of parents,
trying to associate parents with their child. I will then
give them a list of my team rules, along with my 
expectations for their child and them throughout the season.

This personal interaction is very beneficial. Our Athletic
Commission mandates this for each team, and it really works
out well. It immediately opens the communication lines
between parents and coaches, as well as players and coaches.
It makes the players sense that this is really a partnership
with all of us working together to learn and have fun doing
it! 

------------------------------------------------------------
Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


              November 2003


------------------------------------------------------------
Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

10/31/2003 ** November 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

------------------------------------------------------------
IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Why Drills Are Important 
=> Shooting - A Drill to Get a Lot of Shots 
=> Passing - Start Them Off in Place 
=> Defense - Practice and Game Situations 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Get a Second Opinion 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
Get ready for the upcoming season!

Learn my unique way of teaching players how to shoot:
www.scoremorehoops.com

Teach your team how to play man-to-man defense:
www.scoremorehoops.com/defend_the_hoop.htm 

** My new "basketball guide" with over 50 basketball terms 
defined is now available! This is a great resource for
coaches, players, spouses, or anyone new to the game.
To purchase, send a check or money order for $2.50 to:

Pavlovic Publications
Basketball Guide
1128 Gillian St.
Lemont, IL 60439

(Illinois residents, please add 7 3/4% sales tax) 

** Also, I have updated the newsletter archives. You can
now review up through June of 2003. Go to the "Free
Resources" section, then click on the "Newsletter
Archives" link. 


------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Why Drills Are Important
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

The first practice or two of the new season are always the
most interesting for me. Who has improved their skills, who
hasn't picked up a basketball in 7 months, who has grown
and who hasn't. I make a lot of notes to keep things 
straight!

One of the first things young players always ask me is,
"Coach, when are we going to play a game?" I always have to
slow them down and explain that basketball is more than just
running up and down the court and throwing the ball at the
basket. I explain to them that we must learn the basketball
basics before we will have an intrasquad scrimmage or any
games. You must learn to walk before your run!

It gets very tempting for new coaches to just let the
players start scrimmaging. But don't do it! There are too
many bad habits that will develop, and nothing good will
come out of it. Take the time to drill the basics of 
dribbling, passing, shooting, defense and rebounding. Then
you can add an offensive set. 

At this point you can look at running a controlled 
scrimmage with your team. Stop and explain to your team when 
they have made a mistake. Also, explain how the drills that
you have gone over pertain to the actual game situation. It
will be a much more productive way for your players to learn.

How long should you hold off before you scrimmage? That 
depends on when your first real game is. You will of course
need time to learn your offense, and you want your players
to be prepared for the game. But get them to perform the
basics first. It will help your team in the long run. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Shooting - A Drill to Get a Lot of Shots 

Depending where you hold your practice, you may only have
2 baskets to shoot at. Some teams are lucky to have portable
baskets and baskets on the side walls. These are nice because
you can separate your players and get a lot of shooting done
in a short period of time.

But what if you only have 2 baskets and a bunch of players?
I like to use a drill where I put 7 players at each basket
with a ball. 3 are on each side of the lane, using the spaces
that they would line up for a free throw. The last player is
at the free throw line. On the whistle, the players go in 
order and shoot from the spot they are in, get their own
rebound, and get back to that same spot. We go clockwise
around the lane, and let them go for a minute. Then we each
rotate one position until everyone has shot from each spot.

You can adapt this drill for different numbers of players,
and you can make a contest out of it. When I do that, I
have a coach watch each basket and have the players count
out loud, so there's no mistake on their number. It has
helped us practice our short shots, which is where we hope
we get our shots during the game. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Passing - Start Them Off in Place

As with dribbling, start your players off with passing by
having them in a stationary position. Simply standing 5-8
feet apart and throwing passes will teach them the basic
technique. Then once they have this down, add drills like
the speed passing drill, the star drill, or any kind of
drill that adds movement.

The reason for this is quite simple. If you add motion to
your passing drills right away, it just adds another level
of complexity for your players. They now have to think
about where they need to move to besides making a good pass.
So make it easier on them. Let them learn the correct
technique, then add on. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Defense - Practice and Game Situations

Does your team look great on defense during practice drills,
but they never look that way during a game? I have had a few
teams like that. It gets frustrating, but I think I have
found a way to help them.

One thing I have noticed over the years is that teammates
usually don't like to make each other look bad. So if you
are doing a one-on-one drill during practice, most players
will give about the same effort. But during a game, your
opponent wants to take advantage of every situation. They
are not going to go a little slower driving to the basket
in order for the defender to stay in front of them. 

So encourage your team to work each other hard during
practice. If you are doing a defensive drill and you
have players on offense, the offense must perform at the
same speed they would in a game situation, even if they
drive right by their teammate. It's going to show the 
defender that they must work harder against an opponent.
This type of practice will prepare them for the actual game,
and they won't be caught by surprise.

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Coaching Tip of the Month - Get a Second Opinion 

If you are having problems with any area of your teams'
game, don't hesitate about asking your assistants or
another coach in your program for their opinion. Sometimes
you can look at a situation so long that you can no longer
be objective. That's when another opinion is very valuable.

No one person has all the answers. I will still go to
other experienced coaches in our program and ask them about
any problem areas with my team. Many times they will see
something that I have not seen. That will help my team to
improve, which is what I want for them.

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Have a great month!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


                 December 2003


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Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter

"A newsletter of proven tips for youth basketball coaches"

11/30/2003 ** December 2003 Issue ** 
Steve Pavlovic, Editor, Steve@scoremorehoops.com
------------------------------------------------------------
By subscription only! Welcome to the current issue of
"Coach Steve Pavlovic's Coaching Basketball Newsletter".
You are receiving this newsletter because you
requested a subscription. Unsubscribe instructions
are at the end of this newsletter.

** Feel free to forward this ezine to any coaches that you
think this would benefit, or direct them to:
www.scoremorehoops.com
so that they can sign up for this newsletter! ** 

Welcome to all new subscribers! This ezine is published 
monthly, usually sent out on the first of each month. 

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IN THIS ISSUE
------------------------------------------------------------

=> Sponsorship Notice 
=> Feature Article - Explain Your Drills 
=> Shooting - Drills Without a Ball 
=> Passing - Triple Threat Position 
=> Rebounding - Protect the Ball 
=> Coaching Tip of the Month - Following Directions 
=> Subscribe/Unsubscribe information

------------------------------------------------------------
SPONSORSHIP NOTICE
------------------------------------------------------------
Get ready for the upcoming season!

Read a sample of my "Score More Hoops" ebook!
www.scoremorehoops.com

Also, make sure to check out the archives if you are missing
a newsletter. 

------------------------------------------------------------
FEATURE ARTICLE, Explain Your Drills
by Steve Pavlovic
------------------------------------------------------------

Every team runs drills during practice. But do your drills
translate into improved performance during a game? Or does
your team perform drills well, but during a game they don't
put those same skills to use? I think I can help you and your
team!

I try to set up a lot of drills so that they are a small
part of our offense or defense. For example, I will run a 
drill that has our guards working on getting a pass on the
wing position. Or I will set up our post players for
receiving a pass and squaring up to the basket. 

The most important thing I have learned to teach my players
is to explain the purpose of each drill that we run. I want
them to know what I expect them to take out of the drill
pertaining to game situations. I have found this to be very
helpful. I know what I want my players to focus on, but if I
don't tell them, how will they know? I have noticed that this
also helps my teams to focus better during practice. It makes
them think, instead of just going through the motions during
practice. Give them a purpose behind each drill. They can
then relate that when you are going over your offense or
defense. It will help your team on both ends of the court. 

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Shooting - Drills Without a Ball 

Most players think that if the shot went in, no matter what
form they used, that it was a good shot. But that logic 
quickly catches up to them. If you don't use the correct form,
yes, some shots will still go in, but many more won't.

I always like to take my players at the beginning of the
season and work with them on shooting without the ball. I 
have found this to be very helpful. Instead of worrying
about if the ball goes in the basket, I can get the players
to concentrate on their shooting form. Then when the ball
is added, they have their body and mind somewhat trained.
Their form is greatly improved, with their elbow being
straight, shoulders squared, and a good solid base.

I run 2 main drills to work on this. The first is that I
have my players line up and act like they are shooting a 
lay-up without the ball. I focus on making sure they are 
jumping off the correct leg, and that the correct hand would
be being used to shoot the ball. The second one is to have 
my players shoot a free throw without the ball. Once again,
they can go through a mental checklist of my steps to shoot,
without thinking about the ball. Try this with your team,
especially your players who are having shooting problems. It
will help them a lot. 

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Passing - Triple Threat Position 

A player must be ready and in position when they receive a
pass to either, dribble, pass, or shoot. Basketball is a 
quick moving sport, so I teach my players to get in a ready
position to do these things. That's why we call it the
Triple Threat Position.

This is especially important when you have players moving
on your offense. As I'm sure you know, a player cutting to
the basket is only open for a second or two. Your team must
be ready to get them the ball.

The easiest way I have found is to get your players in the
routine of getting in the triple threat position each time
they receive a pass. Shoulders should be squared to the
basket, knees bent, ball on your strong hand side, ready to
perform any of the 3 options. They don't want to do things
at too fast of a pace, but they must learn to react quickly
and take advantage of the defense. 

------------------------------------------------------------
Rebounding - Protect the Ball

I always stress to my players to protect the ball after
they get a defensive rebound. Too many times I see players
work so hard to get a rebound, then turn and bring the ball
down, only to get it stripped away by an opponent. That gets
frustrating.

I teach my players to get a rebound and keep the ball high
and slightly forward, as well as holding onto the ball
tightly with both hands. Then I get them to pivot and see the
whole floor. They are then ready to make a pass to an 
open outlet and start our fastbreak or set up the offense.

------------------------------------------------------------
Coaching Tip of the Month - Following Directions 

In order for your team to be successful, everyone must be
on the same page. All of your players must hear the same
thing that you are saying. If have hear one thing and the
other half hear something else, there will be chaos on the
floor.

One way I get my players to all follow and listen is by the
way that I start all of my drills. My players know that they
start a drill only on my whistle. Not when a coach yells "go",
but only on my whistle. This forces them all to pay close
attention. It takes a few practices to get them accustomed
to this, but they learn quickly. And it teaches me that I
better never forget my whistle when I come to practice!

------------------------------------------------------------
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!! 
------------------------------------------------------------

Stephen Pavlovic

Send any questions, comments, or ideas to me at:
Steve@scoremorehoops.com

------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 by Stephen Pavlovic. All rights Reserved.
------------------------------------------------------------


 

  

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